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2019 Jaguars NFL Draft Profile: Duke Quarterback Daniel Jones

Zach Goodall

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Oct 27, 2018; Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Duke Blue Devils quarterback Daniel Jones (17) warms up before playing the Pittsburgh Panthers at Heinz Field. PITT won 54-45. Mandatory Credit: Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports

In the wake of Jaguars quarterback Blake Bortles’ poor start to the 2018 season, it’s time to acknowledge his three-year contract extension this past February was a mistake, and the Jaguars must begin to look for his eventual replacement as the team’s signal caller.

That’s right, baby. It’s time for NFL Draft scouting reports. And today, we’re starting with Duke quarterback Daniel Jones.

Now, before we get started, let’s assume the Jaguars make no staff changes this offseason, even after what appears to be a massive disappointment of a 2018 season following contending in the 2017 AFC Championship. It isn’t possible, or fair, to predict any big staff changes at this point after GM Dave Caldwell, EVP of Football Ops. Tom Coughlin, and head coach Doug Marrone received extensions in February. While that sounds contracting to the lede of this article, it’s safe to assume that the Jaguars won’t necessarily move on from Bortles this offseason, and rather will likely draft his eventual heir and/or competition this upcoming April.

Given that assumption, one would think the Jaguars will continue to feature a power-run with RB Leonard Fournette as the focal point, and that offensive coordinator will maintain West Coast passing concepts as a way to move the ball through the air: A round hole that the team has tried to shove Bortles – the square peg – into for the past two years.

Jones, a redshirt junior who appears to be on track to graduate this year, is the best West Coast style of quarterback in this upcoming QB class, albeit it isn’t the strongest QB class to come out in recent years. The terms you’ll see thrown around Jones’ name this draft season will include “quick-release”, “smart decision making”, “touch passes”, and something along the lines of “lack of elite velocity”. All of these buzzwords match what the traditional West Coast offense looks for in a QB, with velocity not being a must-have trait.

On top of the WCO fit, Jones is on pace to match most of the Bill Parcells rules of QB scouting, a method in which Coughlin stated he utilizes in his book Earn the Right to Win. These rules include:

  1. Be a senior (redshirt junior is likely a fair bending of the rules)
  2. Be a graduate (Jones appears to be on pace to do so)
  3. Three-year starter (check)
  4. Start 30 games (32 and counting, check)
  5. Win 23 games (Jones has 15 career wins in games he’s started, and missed two wins this year with a broken collarbone. Duke has three more games left, plus a bowl game, so even if Duke wins out he will come short of 23 wins)
  6. Post a 2:1 TD:INT ratio (Jones currently posts a 1.72:1 ratio, but has a 2.6:1 ratio this season and is on pace to post a career high in TDs and low in INTs with four games remaining, so we can revisit this)
  7. Post a 60%+ career completion percentage (currently at 60.1%, another stat to revisit in January)

All in all, Jones will leave Duke with at least four of the seven Parcells QB scouting rules checked off, with five being likely and six being the maximum.

In seven of Duke’s nine games this year, Jones has completed 135-218 passes (61.9%) for 1587 yards, 13 touchdowns and five interceptions. He is a two-time team captain (2017-18) and two-time Academic All-ACC (2016-17). Entering the 2018 season, he was listed as a candidate for the Maxwell, O’Brien, and Manning awards. Jones only missed two games this year due to a broken collarbone in his non-throwing shoulder, and that tough mantra is evident when he takes hits as a runner on tape.

Jones’ head coach David Cutcliffe is the former college coach of three former first round quarterbacks in Peyton and Eli Manning, as well as Heath Shuler. The Manning brothers have been key to Jones’ development as they have trained with him and the Duke football team since 2013, and Jones has attended their summer QB camp for the past two years.

Let’s get to the film (2018 games vs. Northwestern, Pittsburgh, Georgia Tech and Virginia Tech) to see what Jones has to offer as a quarterback prospect.

NFL Traits: Pre-snap awareness and post-snap baiting

Daniel Jones may often be labeled with the previously mentioned buzzwords, but the most important, and advanced, part of Jones’ skill-set are his eyes, in how they pick up openings in the defense pre-snap, and also create openings post-snap.

The most immediate thing that stands out in the Northwestern game, the first game of Jones’ that I watched, is how many RPO’s and play action and Duke runs. That should automatically catch the Jaguars’ eye, as play action/RPO’s are a big piece to a West Coast passing offense in order to stretch the field and catch defenses off guard.

Note: Bear with the bad drawing here, it gets better as we go on. I had just downloaded new video editing software and was learning how to draw with it.

Pre-snap, Jones sees two creeping defenders turning this into a six-man blitz, and knows that the middle of the field is going to open up as long as he sells the run. He does so, forcing the weak-side linebacker to creep up as well. That was a fatal mistake by the LB that Jones took advantage of with the slant route opening up, and Jones let the ball fly on the top of his one step drop in unison with the top of the receivers route. This opens up a ton of extra yards to gain after the catch, which is the bread and butter of the WCO.

Jones’ awareness and ability to read defenses pre-snap is one of his more polished abilities as a signal-caller, which is something more worth deeming as “pro-style” than the bland under-center = pro-style narrative that’s been around for ages.

In the play before, Jones baited the coverage linebacker into opening the field. Here, Jones does the same with the single-high safety to open up the deep post. Keeping his eyes modest on the left half of the field, Jones is patient before he declares where he’s going and draws the high safety to the 12 yard dig route by the tight end, and boom: The outside receiver has all of the inside leverage to get open on the deep post. While Jones doesn’t have a cannon arm to get this ball to the WR as fast as Patrick Mahomes can, his timing and touch on the ball makes up for the lack of arm strength, and this ball gets placed perfectly for the long score.

We get a taste of both pre-snap awareness and baiting in one play here, and it’s so nice you can view it twice (there’s a second angle). The defense lines up with what almost looks like a three-safety prevent-look with two corners playing man underneath. However, the middle safety drops pre-snap and this turns into what appears to be a split-field Cover 2 on the top and man/off-man responsible for the TE and WR on the bottom. All in all, it’s a complex, unique coverage call.

Jones catches the top half Cover 2 with two 8+ yard off-safeties. He already knows his left slot will be wide open on a deep slant, and yards-after-catch potential if he baits the deep safety and middle linebacker through the fake handoff. In the second half of the clip, Jones does just that by keeping his eyes in between the two mid-field defenders, despite knowing he’s going left. Both defenders false step, and the slant is open for business.

This is one of the more impressive bait throws Jones made in the four games I watched. With pressure coming off both edges, Jones keeps his eyes down field at the slot WR on the seam that draws the safety and cornerback deep. As Jones steps up to avoid pressure, the flat-defending linebacker fills the intermediate zone for the cornerback and turns his back to the sidelines to read Jones’ eyes, which are still focused on the seam but notice the outside receiver coming back on a steep hitch, totally unnoticed by the linebacker. Jones’ deception of the coverage defenders looked easy and lead to a big third down conversion.

The last bait-play I want to touch on is Jones keeping his eyes directly in the middle of the field to draw the free safety into the tight end post, with the H-back running a wheel route outside of the free safety’s peripheral vision. The outside linebacker disguises as a fifth rusher but is actually in man on the H-back, but misses a chance to jam near the line of scrimmage. The wheel opens up as soon as the FS commits to the post and Jones wastes no time to release a nice touch pass, resulting in a 27 yard gain.

Progressions

Before we get into the West Coast and primary reads, it’s worth noting Jones is developed enough to make full-field progessions and isn’t going limited to primary reads and checkdowns. Jones quickly scans his options from top through the right hash and identifies the opening skinny post as the receiver makes his break and, after putting the safety on skates, can walk the perfectly placed deep ball in for six.

Jones has five potential receving options here, and even with pressure beginning to form in the pocket, Jones scans and eliminates the two top receivers as they are well-covered, and begins to roll with a TE check-down on an out-route. The right slot receiver takes the outside cornerback with him deep, and with Jones eyeing the TE out-route, the outside receiver becomes open on the sideline as the fourth read with the slot stretching out the defense to open up the underneath. Jones gave every route worth consideration a shot before making the smartest decision with the ball while also baiting the safety into coming down on the TE to open up the sideline.

Jones once again scans the entire spread field in a timely manner before throwing a touch pass over a jumping defender near the first down marker. The throw is really nice; The patience and movement in the pocket in order to move the ball without abandoning the play and running is perfect.

West Coast fit

Here’s where Jones really starts to look the part for Jacksonville, as things stand.

The most important aspect to a West Coast QB’s game is his release. Blake Bortles doesn’t fit this mold because he has a naturally elongated release that often leads to passes getting batted at the line or defenders jumping routes. On top of that, Bortles often needs his primary read to be schemed open and a check-down option because his mental processing of the field isn’t quick enough to match what the WCO wants. Bill Walsh, former 49ers coach and the mastermind behind the WCO, believes an ideal WCO passing play ends with a release at the top of the QB’s 3-5-7 step drop in the pocket, and Bortles just can’t do that consistently whatsoever.

However, Daniel Jones can. Jones plays out of the shotgun a solid 95%+ of the time at Duke which in itself is at least a three-step drop, so immediate/one-step releases count towards being WCO-style.

Is this complex? No. It’s a simple play-action play with and eight yard slant as the primary read on a three-step (one-step gun) drop throwing with power off of the back foot. However, this ball is out as soon as Jones gets pointed the receivers way off of the fake handoff fresh out of the WRs route-break. This quick release taking advantage of the primary read’s spacing is another example of bread and butter West Coast concepts that Jacksonville builds it’s passing game off of.

Another really simple, yet effective, WCO style throw, taking advantage of zone with about an eight yard cushion to the bottom WR. At the top of the route, the WR has about four yards of separation and the ball is already off the tip of Jones’ fingers. Not to mention, this ball is placed in a perfect spot for the WR to spin his body back downfield and gain extra yards. Just, the WR doesn’t appear to have the explosiveness to take advantage. If Dede Westbrook catches this pass, he very well may take this the full 80 yards to the endzone.

The WCO calls for window passes in the short field when things aren’t schemed open, and Jones squeezes this ball right in between the nickel cornerback and the closing linebacker off the top of the receivers route.

Along with timing your throws, accuracy is the most important aspect of West Coast passing. If the ball isn’t put in the most ideal position for the receiver to win the rep, it most likely isn’t accurate enough. Here, Jones rolls to his weak-side and throws this ball off of his back foot – yet, the ball is low and away where only the receiver can play the ball and Duke adds six to the scoreboard.

Touch passes

Jones perfectly squeezes this slot fade to the back corner better than, quite frankly, Blake Bortles has ever thrown a fade pass in his five-year Jaguars career. Way out of reach of the man coverage nickel cornerback, Jones also keeps this ball nice and outside of the boundary cornerback who tries to save the play post-release.

The sideline route opens up after Jones scans half of the field, and Jones clears the two underneath defenders with plenty of altitude and gets this ball in the receivers hands while he still owns about five yards of separation, despite this toss only going about 23 yards. The ability to get the ball as high as it was to avoid any acrobatic play by the underneath defenders and still hit the WR with plenty of separation is the definition of touch.

Jones has been the victim of plenty of drops in the games I’ve observed, with three TDs/near TDs dropped in the Virginia Tech game alone. This one may have been the worst: Jones steps up through interior pressure and launches this ball 45 yards where only the receiver make a diving catch, and it falls right through his hands. This wasn’t a difficult diving catch to make, either. The ball had plenty of loft that gave the receiver time to track and was perfectly led with two defenders closing in.

On the run

There’s no need to post a bunch of different clips of Jones running the ball because he’s obviously tasked with being a passer, but when things breakdown as well as designed options, Jones has the mobility to break loose once in a while. This is also evident on his roll-out passes, a key to play action in a West Coast offense.

General Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Clean footwork through drop and scanning
  • Short to intermediate accuracy is strong
  • Touch throws make up for lack of strong velocity
  • Not fast, but mobile. Can make plays on his feet and throw on roll-outs
  • Advanced in reading defenses pre-snap
  • Generally makes smart decisions post-snap
  • Uses eyes to bait defenders at a pro level
  • Tough as nails, played two weeks after breaking left collarbone

Cons

  • Occasionally throws off back foot when going deep, leads to too much air under pass
  • Arm strength isn’t there to run a consistent vertical offense
  • Fumble issues: Nine in three years
  • Thin frame may frighten teams, played through injury redshirt sophomore year
  • Lack of explosion lowers “ceiling” and ability to grow at NFL level
  • May be limited to West Coast offense with short game as strong suit
  • Doesn’t slide when running the ball, often takes hits he doesn’t need to

Conclusion

Daniel Jones seems to be a true West Coast, pro-ready QB who makes disciplined reads and has advanced eyes that can bait opposing defenses into giving him a chunk play. His footwork could use some polishing through his release, but he is relatively accurate, espeically in the short and intermediate field and has the mobility to make plays of his own in a power-run/WCO style of offense, making him a perfect fit for the Jacksonville Jaguars.

I view Jones as a late first round/early second round prospect, but considering how light this QB class is at the top, Jones may skyrocket into the early 20s and maybe even the teens come draft night. As of 11/6/2018, the Jaguars are currently projected to pick 12th overall, so they may have to reach to select Jones if they stay around the same spot, but if they believe he fits what they want in a quarterback the way his film suggests, they should have no problem selecting Jones as the heir to Blake Bortles.

Zach Goodall covers the Jacksonville Jaguars for the Locked On Jaguars podcast and website. Follow him on Twitter @zach_goodall.

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Jacksonville Jaguars

Josh Allen shines in Jaguars 22-7 loss to Miami Dolphins

Demetrius Harvey

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Aug 22, 2019; Miami Gardens, FL, USA; Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end Josh Allen (41) pressures Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick (14) during the first half at Hard Rock Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports

Josh Allen showed out on the national stage and proved why he deserved to be the seventh-overall pick this year.

Tonight was the night of firsts for the Jaguars. It was the first time the first-team offense and defense took the field for the Jaguars this year. The first time anyone has gotten a good look at Nick Foles in a Jaguars uniform, and the first time we got an extensive look at the Jaguars rookie seventh-overall pick defensive end Josh Allen.

Allen was able to take advantage of a very poor Dolphins offensive line and downright dominant in the first half of the game. For the night, Allen was credited with four combined tackles as the Jaguars tried to get him on the field as much as possible. Despite saying otherwise earlier this season, the Jaguars actually opened up in a 3-4 look with Yannick Ngakoue and Allen on opposite sides. With defensive assistant Dom Capers in the fold, the Jaguars may be a bit more creative on defense this year.

Getting into the Dolphins’ backfield practically all night, Allen put on a show. With several tackles for loss, a couple of quarterback hits, and great pass coverage, Allen showed just why he was taken in the top-10. The Jaguars used Allen in every way possible tonight, and there is no reason to believe that will stop during the regular season.

Allen will be a pleasure to watch in 2019 especially with Calais Campbell, Yannick Ngakoue, and Marcell Dareus playing with him.

Allen wasn’t the only player being showcased tonight for the Jaguars. This was the first time tonight the Jaguars — and the nation —  got a good look at quarterback Foles since he left Philadelphia.

Foles held his own against the Dolphins after going 6/10 for 48 yards,  with one touchdown, and an interception. Foles had a couple of rough drives and began the game leading the offense to a quick three-and-out, but overall looked just fine against the Dolphins first-team defense.

After a summer of Foles to Chris Conley connections being made, it was Foles and receiver Dede Westbrook who seemed to be the most in sync. Westbrook hauled in the 10-yard touchdown throw from Foles along with 3 other receptions for a total of 29 yards on the night.

The Jaguars would go onto fall to the Dolphins 22-7 after a poor showing by the Jaguars second and third-team offense, but the talk of the night will ultimately be the great performance by defensive end Josh Allen.

Five observations:

1. The Jaguars offensive line will be fine — if healthy

Left tackle Cam Robinson made his debut tonight after recovering from a 2018 torn ACL. Although Robinson did not play very long, he had a great night against the Dolphins’ poor defensive line.

The Jaguars remaining starters included: Andrew Norwell, Brandon Linder, Will Richardson, and Jawaan Taylor. Taylor got his first action tonight as a Jaguar after recovering from a knee injury. Richardson is seemingly entrenched in the starting right guard role with A.J. Cann playing a majority of the night with the backups after Richardson was finished.

2. Leonard Fournette is a threat out of the backfield

This should be obvious, however, the Jaguars fourth-overall pick showed tonight he can be a threat in the passing game.  With two receptions for 15 yards, Fournette showed well catching passes from Foles as he has all summer. On the night Fournette added seven rushes for 27 yards. Fournette showed power and speed once he got into the open field.

3. The Jaguars potential sixth receiver spot is still wide open

Quite frankly, the Jaguars are still searching for their sixth receiver. During the first two preseason games, receiver Tre McBride seemingly was the frontrunner for the job along with Terrelle Pryor.

However, Pryor left the game with yet another hamstring injury and McBride had a couple of drops along with 33 receiving yards on three receptions. Receiver C.J. Board was the most productive receiver on the team tonight with four receptions for 56 yards and a drop. This will be a competition to keep an eye on through next week.

4. Taven Bryan is still struggling

The Jaguars have an issue with defensive tackle Taven Bryan. Thus far this preseason, Bryan has not played as expected from a former first-round pick. Tonight showed no different as Bryan accounted for one tackle and two roughing the passer penalties on the night.

Bryan will make the team, but the Jaguars will have an issue if he ever has to play significant snaps in place of starting defensive tackle Marcell Dareus. Bryan will need to quickly develop if he wants to contribute positively to this team this season.

5. Dawuane Smoot is a lot better than he used to be

A former third-round pick, Smoot excelled tonight against the Dolphins porous defensive line. Notching one sack, Smoot was able to take control of the line of scrimmage tonight and prove why he should be on this team. The Jaguars have a great competition and will ultimately be forced to make a tough decision as defensive lineman Datone Jones is performing just as well.

It is possible the Jaguars will opt to keep both — and they should.

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Jacksonville Jaguars

Jaguars preseason week three inactives, Richardson to start

Demetrius Harvey

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Aug 8, 2019; Baltimore, MD, USA; Jacksonville Jaguars offensive tackle Will Richardson (76) looks onto the field during the second half against the Baltimore Ravens at M&T Bank Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sportsst the Baltimore Ravens at M&T Bank Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports

The Jacksonville Jaguars and the Miami Dolphins are set to kick off at 8:00 p.m. eastern time at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida.

For the Jaguars, they will finally get a good look at their starting offensive and defensive units — minus a couple of injuries. The only players not slated to get some reps tonight are: Marqise Lee (knee), Alfred Blue (ankle), Jake Ryan (knee), Quincy Williams (knee), Davis Tull (leg), Charles Jones (foot), Geoff Swaim (foot), Josh Oliver (hamstring), and Marcell Dareus (elbow).

All eyes will be on new Jaguars quarterback Nick Foles tonight as he gets set to play his first game since leaving the Philidelphia Eagles in free agency.

Before the list of players not participating was released, the Jaguars’ Director of Public Relations announced via twitter, left tackle Cam Robinson will be making his first appearance tonight, although on a limited basis. Robinson will be on a “strict” snap count for tonight’s game.

Expect the Jaguars starters to play only a couple of series tonight as the Jaguars look to continue keeping them safe for the regular season.

Jaguars right guard Will Richardson will be starting tonight ahead of A.J. Cann. Richardson has been in a constant battle with the veteran since camp began.

Second-round pick Jawaan Taylor will be starting at right tackle. It is the rookie’s first in-game action for the Jaguars this preseason.

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Jacksonville Jaguars

Preseason Week 3: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins preview

Demetrius Harvey

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Aug 15, 2019; Jacksonville, FL, USA; Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback Nick Foles (7) looks on during the fourth quarter against the Philadelphia Eagles at TIAA Bank Field. Mandatory Credit: Douglas DeFelice-USA TODAY Sports

This week against the Miami Dolphins, the Jacksonville Jaguars will finally get a really good look at their $88M prized possession, Nick Foles. Foles, along with the starting offensive line, Leonard Fournette, and the majority of the teams’ starting players will get the ball rolling early against the Dolphins. How long they will play for likely depends on the success of the team, however, they won’t be playing for very long.

The game will be televised nationally on FOX, so everyone will finally get a good look at the $88M man. Joe Buck and Troy Aikman will be calling the game.

The only players not set to play for the Jaguars on Thursday are: Marqise Lee (knee), Alfred Blue (ankle), Jake Ryan (knee), Quincy Williams (knee), Davis Tull (leg), Charles Jones (foot), Geoff Swaim (foot), Josh Oliver (hamstring), and Marcell Dareus (elbow).

Lee was recently activated from the teams’ PUP list and should be ready to go for the regular season.

Game Time info

  • When: Thursday, August 22nd, 8:00 PM  ET
  • Where: Hard Rock Stadium Miami Gardens, FL
  • Watch: FOX (FOX30 Jacksonville)
  • Listen: Jacksonville 1010XL AM, 92.5FM

Five Keys to Success

  1. Stay Healthy. Once again this is the number one key to success. Even if the Jaguars completely bomb their dress-rehearsal game, as long as they come out of the game fully healthy there is no harm, no foul. Left tackle Cam Robinson will be seeing his first in-game action since tearing his ACL in week two of the 2018 regular season. Keeping him fresh is going to be pivotal for the Jaguars offense this season.
  2. Establish chemistry on the offensive line. The Jaguars will finally get their starting offensive line together on the field at the same time in a game. This is a great opportunity for the team to establish chemistry between each other along with Foles.
  3. Win the trench war. This goes for the offensive and defensive line. The Jaguars must get push on both sides of the football this week to establish the run and get after the quarterback. This will be the first in-game action which will showcase the Jaguars renewed “lightning package”. This includes Josh Allen, Calais Campbell, Taven Bryan, and Yannick Ngakoue. While the team will be without defensive tackle Marcell Dareus for this matchup, it will be a great way to take a look at their renewed pass rush.
  4. Showcase Nick Foles. While the Jaguars do not have to pass the football every down, and they certainly will not do so, getting the most out of Foles’ action tonight will be pivotal to the teams’ success moving forward. Being able to establish in-game camaraderie never hurts, and this is a prime opportunity to do it.
  5. Enjoy it. Jaguars fans will finally get their opportunity to see the first-team offense and defense. This game will ultimately set the tone for the regular season.

Key Matchups 

Jaguars receivers vs. Dolphins defensive backs

The Miami Dolphins have two premier defensive backs in their secondary in Xavien Howard and Minkah Fitzpatrick. Playing against either one will be a great test for the Jaguars receivers. This will be the first in-game action for UFA signee Chris Conley. Seeing him, Dede Westbrook and D.J. Chark compete against the Dolphins secondary will be an exciting matchup to watch. It will allow the Jaguars to get a great look at what they truly have at the position.

Jaguars offensive line vs. Dolphins defensive line

The Jaguars have not yet established what their offensive line will look like moving forward into the regular season. This will be a great test for them moving forward against the Dolphins’ defensive line which includes former first-round pick, Charles Harris.

Will Richardson vs. A.J. Cann

Although this is not a matchup between two opposing players, it will be a competition to watch during Thursday’s game. Offensive tackle/guard Will Richardson and A.J. Cann have been battling for the teams’ starting right guard position throughout training camp.

Five Players to watch

1. Nick Foles

Foles will be the focus for Thursday’s game against the Dolphins. Nationally. It will be the first in-game action anyone has seen Foles play since his playoff loss to the New Orleans Saints in February as a member of the Philadelphia Eagles. For Jaguars fans they will finally get to see what kind of player the $88M man is. Foles will likely be playing only a couple of series depending on how the game goes, but he is absolutely the number one player to watch.

Nick Foles spoke to the Jaguars media shortly after practice on Sunday and was asked just how important getting the offensive line together was, he stated, “Really the most important piece of the offense is the offensive line. The way they work together, the way they communicate, the way we recognize fronts, our run game, our pass protection. The way that those guys communicate is a work of art, so to have them all out there working, developing, communicating is huge for us right now. So, it’s happening at the right time, so we have to really take advantage of every single day.”

If the Jaguars can establish their offensive line, it will lead to great success for Foles and the rest of the Jaguars offense.

2. Cam Robinson

Robinson has not played a down for the Jaguars since week-two of the 2018 regular season, and before last week there were questions regarding his availability for the start of the season. Instead, Robinson will play on Thursday night. The question remains, however, how much will the left tackle play?

Keep a close eye on Robinson and how he handles pass-rush snaps. His health is of the utmost importance to the Jaguars offensive line, which ultimately determines the success of the offense as a whole.

3. Leonard Fournette

Fournette has had a sort of revitalization of his career arc throughout this offseason. Not only has he shown up to nearly every offseason activity, but he has also shown up healthy and in shape. Keeping Fournette healthy will be majorly important for the Jaguars offense this season. Seeing him get some in-game action will be interesting.

4. Terrelle Pryor

After earning praise during the early portions of training camp, the fire lit by Pryor has become rather dim. Dealing with injuries for the past couple of weeks the former quarterback-turned-wideout has not had an opportunity to showcase his talents in games. This will be a great opportunity for Pryor to earn his spot on the 53-man roster which has seemingly been handed to him due to his size (6’4″ 228 pounds) and speed (4.30 40-yard dash).

The Jaguars will very likely be retaining six receivers at the final cutdowns, and Pryor is squarely in the mix.

5. Jawaan Taylor

Heading into week three of the preseason, it is unclear if Jaguars rookie offensive tackle Jawaan Taylor will receive the first-team snaps at right tackle. Coming off of a knee injury in which head coach Doug Marrone described as “not serious at all”, Taylor will be one of the key players to watch.

If he is able to establish himself as the starting right tackle opposite of Robinson, it will pay dividends to the Jaguars protection and run game moving forward. The Jaguars can ill-afford to head into the season with either Cedric Ogbuehi or Leonard Wester starting.

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